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Taxes in Other EuroMillions Countries

If you win a EuroMillions prize in Austria, Belgium, France, Ireland or Luxembourg, you will not be taxed on your winnings, just like in the UK. However, winners will be taxed in Portugal, Spain and Switzerland.

In Portugal, any prize worth more €5,000 is taxed at a rate of 20 percent, while there is a levy of 35 percent in Switzerland on any winnings over CHF1 million. Spanish prizes of more than €40,000 are subject to tax at 20 percent.

You can only claim a EuroMillions prize in the country where you bought your ticket, so you will have to accept the local rules on tax even if you are not a resident of the country.

How to Identify a EuroMillions Lottery Scam

  • It is not possible to win a EuroMillions prize, raffle, sweepstake or competition that you have not entered. If you receive a notification informing you that you have won a prize in a game you have never played, it is a scam.
  • To win a EuroMillions prize, you must have purchased a ticket for the correct draw date and your number selection must match the balls required to win the relevant prize.
  • You do not win EuroMillions prizes based on randomly selected mobile phone numbers or email addresses, including for games which you did not enter.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay any type of ‘fee’ to receive your prize.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay the ‘tax’ due on the win in advance of receiving a prize.

Clues to Identify a Scam

All of the points listed below are usually a good indication that the winning notification you have received is a scam:

  • The email has been sent from a free webmail address (for example @hotmail.com, @outlook.com or @yahoo.com) or from an unrelated address that could have been compromised.
  • The letter or email does not address you personally but instead starts with something vague like ‘Dear Winner’. This may not always be the case, however, so don’t assume the message is genuine just because it uses your name.
  • Scam letters are often on poor quality, photocopied letterhead (although some will include a genuine business address in an attempt to provide legitimacy). It is worth noting that not all scam letters are of a low quality; scammers are constantly updating and improving technology so their messages may appear more legitimate.
  • There is often a strict time limit to claim the ‘prize’. This is intended to put the potential victim under pressure and deter them from seeking advice or investigating the matter further.
  • Confidentiality is often demanded as a ‘condition of winning’. Again, this is to deter the recipient from seeking the advice of friends or family who may be more familiar with this type of scam.
  • The communication may contain complicated language and jargon, such as ticket numbers and ‘batch’ references in an attempt to give the document an ‘official’ feel.
  • Poor spelling, grammar and syntax are usually a good indication that the letter or email is a scam.
  • A photocopy of a cheque with your name on it may be contained within the communication to entice you into sending funds, something which real lotteries would never do.
  • Some scams may claim to be from Euro-Millions.com, but please remember that we will never contact you under any circumstances to say you have won a prize. Any prize notifications that supposedly originate from Euro-Millions.com are fraudulent.

Prize Amounts and Statistics

Here is how the EuroMillions prize fund is distributed across each of the 13 prize tiers. The table also shows statistics for the highest and lowest amount ever given away in each category, along with the highest and lowest number of winners in each tier.

Match % Prize Fund Odds of Winning Lowest Ever Prize Amount Highest Ever Prize Amount Average Prize Amount Per Draw Lowest Ever Winners Highest Ever Winners Average Winners Per Draw
5 + 2 50% 1 in 139,838,160 €17,000,000.00 €190,000,000.00 €59,550,482.75 2 0.2
5 + 1 2.61% 1 in 6,991,908 €64,840.10 €5,227,531.10 €412,802.79 17 3.6
5 + 0 0.61% 1 in 3,107,515 €7,000.00 €969,918.10 €58,999.80 36 8.3
4 + 2 0.19% 1 in 621,503 €309.80 €9,956.60 €3,105.64 8 172 42
4 + 1 0.35% 1 in 31,075 €59.00 €266.30 €161.85 249 3,119 823
3 + 2 0.37% 1 in 14,125 €23.10 €179.30 €100.47 517 6,898 1,831
4 + 0 0.26% 1 in 13,811 €21.50 €91.90 €56.02 630 5,668 1,844
2 + 2 1.30% 1 in 985 €8.40 €31.10 €18.72 7,338 98,958 26,173
3 + 1 1.45% 1 in 706 €7.00 €20.30 €13.93 12,558 116,308 35,931
3 + 0 2.70% 1 in 314 €6.40 €17.30 €11.62 29,444 221,456 80,404
1 + 2 3.27% 1 in 188 €4.40 €16.50 €9.86 38,881 486,402 136,389
2 + 1 10.30% 1 in 49 €4.10 €11.10 €7.58 181,198 1,438,780 511,411
2 + 0 16.59% 1 in 22 €3.20 €5.30 €4.28 488,245 2,959,529 1,143,354

Figures calculated using results drawn between 27/09/2016 and 10/11/2020.

This column displays the percentage of the prize fund allocated to each prize level. The remaining 10% goes into a separate fund, known as the Booster Fund, which is used to ensure there is always enough for the advertised minimum jackpot of €17 million. EuroMillions occasionally holds special draws or promotions, where the guaranteed minimum jackpot can be increased up to as much as €130 million, using surplus funds from the Booster Fund.

The 50% allocated to the jackpot only applies for the first five draws in a series of rollovers. Once the top prize has rolled over five times in a row, the ‘Match 5 + 2’ allocation is adjusted down to 42% until the jackpot gets won. The remaining 8% goes to the Booster Fund, ensuring that this reserve pot receives 18% of funds from the sixth draw in a rollover series until the jackpot is won.

The lowest and highest prize amounts for each prize tier, other than the jackpot, are in respect of individual winning tickets.
The Match 5 + 2 Lucky Stars prize values represent the total jackpot amounts regardless of how many winning tickets there were.

All prize data included in the table above relates to EuroMillions lottery draw results since 27th September 2016 when the Lucky Star pool increased from 11 numbers to 12. The details provided are for information purposes only and are not indicative of future prize values.

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